Elgas response to New Zealand Climate Commission

Elgas is committed to working with government, industry and customers as we transition to a low emissions future.

LPG will continue to be a critical part of New Zealand’s energy mix for many years to come, with viable low carbon alternatives such as bio-LPG already progressing.

Customers can be confident that LPG connections and appliances that are invested in today, will continue to be supplied for the life of these appliances, and well beyond 2025.

The Climate Commission will provide its final advice to the New Zealand Government on 31 May 2021, and we will continue to keep our customers informed.

To help answer some of your questions, we have prepared some frequently asked questions below.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Will new LPG connections be banned after 2025?

There has been no formal decision made by the Government. The draft advice by the NZ Climate Commission made a recommendation to ban new LPG connections after 2025. Final advice will be delivered to the Government on 31 May 2021.

 

Will supply of LPG to existing connections be banned after 2025?

No, the draft advice by the NZ Climate Commission did not recommend stopping the supply of existing LPG connections after 2025.

 

What do the draft recommendations mean for my LPG supply?

Nothing is changing right now. You will continue to be supplied LPG as normal.

 

What should I do if I need to replace my LPG appliance?

Customers can be confident that LPG connections and appliances that are invested in today, will continue to be supplied for the life of these appliances, and well beyond 2025.

 

Should I still consider an LPG appliance today?

Yes, LPG appliances are affordable, efficient and reliable. Customers can be confident that LPG appliances that are invested in today, will continue to be supplied for the life of these appliances, and well beyond 2025.

 

What is the life span of an LPG appliance?

It does vary, and can be between 10-20 years depending on the type of appliance.

 

Should I move away from LPG for a new building?

No, LPG is still an excellent option for heating, cooking and hot water in new buildings. The draft advice by the Climate Commission did not recommend stopping the supply of existing LPG connections after 2025.

 

Will it affect my BBQ?

There should be clarification in the final advice, however indications are that BBQ gas bottles and camp stoves will be excluded from the recommended ban.

 

Will Elgas guarantee supply of LPG to customers beyond 2025?

Elgas remains committed to our LPG customers and investing to ensure businesses and households can continue to enjoy the convenience of LPG for heating, hot water, cooking and industrial processes in the future.

 

What is bio-LPG?

Bio-LPG refers to LPG produced through a renewable feedstock. There are a range of technologies which are in use or being explored across the world.

 

When could bio-LPG be brought into New Zealand?

There are many different options, and research and development is rapidly progressing. There is currently no renewable LPG available in New Zealand. However, we continue to explore the feasibility of new technologies and will provide a timeframe when we are able to do so.

 

Does bio-LPG have zero emissions?

Bio-LPG options would be considered low carbon alternatives. Current bio-LPG solutions could deliver up to 80 percent fewer emissions.

 

Will bio-LPG increase the price of the product?

Bio-LPG can be packaged, stored and transported in the same way that LPG is today – so we can continue to use our extensive supply chain and assets to minimise costs to our customers.

 

Can you use bio-LPG with existing LPG appliances?

Yes, it is chemically exactly the same as the LPG that we use today.

 

When will the advice be made final?

The NZ Climate Commission will provide final advice to the Government on 31 May 2021.

 

Why was this draft recommendation made?

The Climate Change Commission was set up by the Zero Carbon Act to advise the government about how to make New Zealand net carbon zero by 2050. The law requires the Commission to advise on ‘sector specific’ policies. Banning new connections is a proposal for reducing carbon emissions from LPG and natural gas in buildings.

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